Draft Biodiversity Strategy 2018-23

Consultation has concluded

Kingston is home to a diverse range of biodiversity including wetlands, heathland, woodlands, grasslands and the Port Phillip Bay coastline. We've updated our Biodiversity Strategy to protect these wonderful assets and ensure they are preserved for future generations to enjoy.

About the draft strategy

The Biodiversity Strategy 2018-23 is a high level document that provides an overarching strategic direction for the operational programs and plans of Council’s Natural Resource Areas (NRA). It provides goals and objectives to protect and preserve Kingston’s biodiversity, and information on Kingston’s natural vegetation.

The draft Strategy determines:

  • updated status of species, legislation, related policies and strategies
  • updating of the previous Action Plan
  • key issues effecting Kingston’s biodiversity
  • creation of a new Action Plan responding to key issues.

Have your say

We're now inviting the community to have its say on the draft strategy. You can:

  • complete the online feedback form below
  • attend a public information session in August
    • Wednesday 8 August, 6pm - 8pm.
    • City of Kingston Cheltenham Offices, Mordialloc/Moorabbin Room.
    • Light refreshments provided.
  • email info@kingston.vic.gov.au
  • write to Parks and Recreation, PO Box 1000, Mentone VIC 3194
  • call us on 1300 653 356.



Kingston is home to a diverse range of biodiversity including wetlands, heathland, woodlands, grasslands and the Port Phillip Bay coastline. We've updated our Biodiversity Strategy to protect these wonderful assets and ensure they are preserved for future generations to enjoy.

About the draft strategy

The Biodiversity Strategy 2018-23 is a high level document that provides an overarching strategic direction for the operational programs and plans of Council’s Natural Resource Areas (NRA). It provides goals and objectives to protect and preserve Kingston’s biodiversity, and information on Kingston’s natural vegetation.

The draft Strategy determines:

  • updated status of species, legislation, related policies and strategies
  • updating of the previous Action Plan
  • key issues effecting Kingston’s biodiversity
  • creation of a new Action Plan responding to key issues.

Have your say

We're now inviting the community to have its say on the draft strategy. You can:

  • complete the online feedback form below
  • attend a public information session in August
    • Wednesday 8 August, 6pm - 8pm.
    • City of Kingston Cheltenham Offices, Mordialloc/Moorabbin Room.
    • Light refreshments provided.
  • email info@kingston.vic.gov.au
  • write to Parks and Recreation, PO Box 1000, Mentone VIC 3194
  • call us on 1300 653 356.



Have your say on the Draft Biodiversity Strategy 2018-22 by completing the feedback form below.

Biodiversity Strategy 2018 – 2013 - comments
I commend the Council on developing a second Biodiversity Strategy (“the Strategy”) and make the following comments.
The Strategy contains much information (75% or so of the document) that would be better published elsewhere (on a web page) as background information as it does not form part of a strategic plan, not does it contribute in any meaningful way to setting out what the aims, objectives, targets and measurable outcomes of the Strategy are or are intended to be.
If the plan exists entirely to support goal 2 of the Council and its layers of “underpinning strategies” surely that can be summarised a little more clearly and succinctly.
The aims and objectives of the Strategy are unclear. Are they the matters listed in dot points at 1.6 on page 10 as “strategic outcomes”? If that is the case, then can they be reworded as aims and objectives. As they are currently written they are neither aims, objectives nor outcomes. An outcome must be able to be measured. If they cannot be quantified they are outputs.
It would be helpful if the Strategy clearly identified what the aims and objectives are for each NRA under Council control and how the Council intends to work with other authorities in those areas that fall in the boundaries of the Council but are under the jurisdiction of another authority.
I will comment specifically on the NRA identified as the Kingston foreshore. It is identified in the Technical report as vulnerable and any resident of that part of Council will be able to confirm that to be the case. There appears to be very little effort in maintenance and care of this vulnerable site (all 13 kilometres of it). I note that the Council’ Coastal Plan recognises conflicts of use and purpose, particularly of residents who appear to include the space between the land they hold and the sea as space over which they hold some rights and act with impunity in removal of vegetation, particularly trees. Council actively contributes to the degradation of the foreshore by planting weed species in public spaces which inevitable spread.
In particular the following plants are abundant from Chelsea to Carrum Creek; Gazanias, Cotyledon orbiculata var orbiculata (Pigs Ear), and Aloe arborescens. Nothing appears to be done about these weeds. In the recent spraying that took place along the foreshore, these species were not sprayed.
Council does not include gazanias as a weed species despite the enormous spread and impact the plant has on the foreshore. Council may actively contribute to the degradation of the foreshore by planting this weed species in public spaces which will inevitably spread.
In parts of the Chelsea/Bonbeach foreshore there are thousands of square metres of gazanias. Gazanias are listed on the Agriculture Victoria web page http://vro.agriculture.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/vrosite.nsf/pages/lwm_pest_plants as an invasive plant with impact in coastal areas. It also notes that this species is a source of food for rabbits, abundant on the foreshore, as well as noting that “Gazania patches are always bare of other plants”, it also notes that it is capable of forming extensive mats and colonises coastal areas. Council actively contributes to this by planting weed species in public spaces.
Little appears to have been done to reintroduce the indigenous flora. Since the late 1970s extensive foreshore revegetation has taken place in neighbouring Bayside. In the1970s Chelsea Council bulldozed the foreshore removing all coastal tee tree scrub and remnant protean forest for some kilometres and introduced marram grass. The tee tree and local acacia species have slowly reappeared in some sections, but much of the foreshore has not recovered. Where coastal banksia is returning, or survived, developers and new residents actively destroy the trees. When will Council act to stop this environmental vandalism?
The plan does not adequately address the loss of trees from domestic properties. It is silent on the “requirement” for housing developments to plat trees, included in their planning permits, and does not monitor whether this has occurred and whether the new trees, if planted, are retained.
The Council notes that domestic dogs are an issue, but dos not patrol the behaviour of dogs (and owners) and is seeking to allow dogs access on a 24/7 basis in Edithvale. This makes no sense when from a foreshore biodiversity perspective. Enforce the cat curfew, there are many cats out at night on the foreshore.
I would hope the Council will revise the Strategy. It should be brief and clear. Pt all background information on a dedicated web page (see the Victorian Government web page). Set out the aims and objectives. Indicate what the actions are for each of these. Include a column for comments (currently much of what is in the actions and outputs columns should rightly be included in comments), list who is responsible against each action, list the outputs. List outcomes only where these are quantifiable, which means there must be quantifiable targets; currently there are none.
I look forward to the release of a revised Strategy



Penelope Pepperell 7 months ago

I commend the council on promoting the protection of our natural resources, but I believe that the proposed 24/7 off leash area on Edithvale beach to be contrary to points raised in the draft of the councillors Biodiversity strategy, in that the strategy identifies dogs as one of the five main pests, in particular having a large effect on already reduced populations of birds, possums and lizards. It does not make sense to saturate a section of the beach, 24/7 year round with dogs off leash.

The foreshore has been identified as an area of significance for indigenous fauna, so we should ensure that off lead dog exercise areas are not adjacent to designated habitat area. Dogs and people are mobile, vegetation habitat is not. People can choose to walk their dogs off-leash somewhere less sensitive. The vegetation does not have this choice.

Maz 7 months ago

Please take into account the adverse affect adding a 24/7 Dog Off-leash zone, on the Kingston foreshore, would have on the established fauna and flora.
Dogs are already documented as one of the biggest pests on the foreshore, and already have ample, well established times allocated for off leash walks.
The majority of local dog owners are conscious of the affect to the dunes, sand and water their dogs have and take care to control their dogs accordingly, as we appreciate this amazing resource we have on our doorstep. The same can not always be said for some of the out of area visitors who already arrive to walk their dogs, and will certainly increase, if a 24/7 off leash zone is introduced.
This will have a terrible affect on the health of the Kingston foreshore, and this can be backed up by the fact that Bayside Council have discussed removing the off-leash zone at Ricketts Point due to the detrimental affect it has had on the environment.

Sharon Wyatt 7 months ago

The Draft Strategy reads well. Anecdotal evidence is that other councils are less timid than Kingston in enforcing actions.

Peter Card 7 months ago

Large housing developments and population increase in the City of Kingston in recent years, caused increased roads use (more cars), large native trees being cut due to subdivisions for additional housing, leaving no space for trees and shrubs. No doubt that our backyard fauna and flora is suffering.
Considering these major local changes, how the present data of local native fauna and flora compares with the one collected between 2007-12 ?
Pending on data results and conclusion, would action be taken to improve the
situation, or developments driven by commercial gains,will have priority over environment protection?
Carmen

Carmen Grostal 7 months ago

Great strategy. Wonderful to see council's commitment to protecting our biodiversity. I learnt something to - didnt realise we had so many reserves with some pretty significant species present.

Kirsty_g20 8 months ago

The Mordialloc Freeway presents threats to wildlife , especially birds and bats that fly across the wetlands to Braeside Park. There are a number of endangered, migratory birds that will potentially be impacted. Sound and light pollution from the Freeway has not been adequately mitigated in the proposal by Vic Roads. Kingston Council has not included this threat in their biodiversity strategy.
R. MacLean

Rose 8 months ago

Totally agree with the strategy described briefly above. I believe that this area which includes the preservation of biodiversity is one of a few which makes the city of Kingston to be so appreciated by all the inhabitants and which add value to our community.

Adrian Pusca 8 months ago

Living Links should include the goal for best management of recreational and non motorised transport activities when they juxtapose or traverse areas where these activities may impact on fauna and/or fauna. E.g. walking, cycling and equestrian. Other plans such as the cycling and walking plan should refer back to this document and should take their design and routing of recreational assets into account.

Persons may for example:
Spread weed seeds to areas of bio diverse significance. Either via footwear, tyres, hooves. Via droppings of animals such as horses.
Disrupt the activities of animals in the area. E.g. Animals mating, traversing their home range/s, raising young.
Cause erosion or ground damage, especially during wet times. Good design of drainage, routing and a stable substrate will minimise this.

Joe Astbury 8 months ago

Sport is wonderful but so is relaxation. It is important to be able to breath fresh air. There is a trend to build homes on blocks that leave no room for gardens. The creation of fence to fence buildings means that the loss off greenery is paramount.. With these developments happening, it more important to protect our green spaces. We all know about the benefit of oxygen that these spaces create, not to mention protecting wildlife also

Ruth Gillespie 8 months ago