Street and Park Tree Management Strategy

Protecting and enhancing Kingston’s urban forest through proper management is vital to sustaining a healthy, vibrant community.

Council has prioritised the management of our urban forest for the environmental and quality of life benefits that trees provide to the community.

We have produced a Street and Park Tree Management Strategy to respond to the community's growing appreciation of trees and the increasing challenge of managing trees in an urban environment.

The strategy pertains to trees located on Council-managed land and outlines Council’s policies and strategic direction for the management of the public component of the urban forest.

Have your say

Have your say on the Street and Park Tree Management Strategy by leaving a comment on the page below or emailing info@kingston.vic.gov.au

You can also write to us at:

Parks and Recreation
City of Kingston
PO Box 1000
Mentone VIC 3195.

Copies of the Street and Park Tree Management Strategy will be available for inspection at Council's customer service centres and libraries.

Consultation ends Friday 19 January 2018.


Protecting and enhancing Kingston’s urban forest through proper management is vital to sustaining a healthy, vibrant community.

Council has prioritised the management of our urban forest for the environmental and quality of life benefits that trees provide to the community.

We have produced a Street and Park Tree Management Strategy to respond to the community's growing appreciation of trees and the increasing challenge of managing trees in an urban environment.

The strategy pertains to trees located on Council-managed land and outlines Council’s policies and strategic direction for the management of the public component of the urban forest.

Have your say

Have your say on the Street and Park Tree Management Strategy by leaving a comment on the page below or emailing info@kingston.vic.gov.au

You can also write to us at:

Parks and Recreation
City of Kingston
PO Box 1000
Mentone VIC 3195.

Copies of the Street and Park Tree Management Strategy will be available for inspection at Council's customer service centres and libraries.

Consultation ends Friday 19 January 2018.


Have your say on the Street and Park Tree Management Strategy by leaving a comment below.
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Why does council not plant a tree on EVERY nature strip?
This is Council managed land. Council should plant.
Doug Robinson
54A Ella Grove
Chelsea 3196

Clare McPhee 11 months ago

To Whom it may concern, Would it be possible to plant suitable native trees, that are indigenous to our area, on all nature strips that do not have any trees growing on them.
This would improve the streetscape, and create a shady canape for all .
Regards ,
Roland Coassin.

Roland Coassin 11 months ago

I was talking to a developer the other day and he tells me that they just poison trees before they start on the application so I agree that we need stiffer penalties especially when we look around trees and I would suggest 100k +. Especially if you look at the trees around Moorabbin business area eg at the back of Bayview, council offices and the street trees.

I would like to see trees replaced with mature trees especially around the tree removal at Moorabbin reserve.

Richard 11 months ago

I believe that the Council should issue really significant fines to landowners/builders who remove trees without obtaining the necessary permit. A fine of $10,000 or even $20,000 could be considered by some to be a small price to pay in the overall scheme of a house costing in excess of half a million dollars. I know of a case where a beautiful large tree, well in excess of the diameter needed to obtain a permit, was removed despite the Council being warned that this was to happen as the builder wanted to put his swimming pool in that position.

Barbara Taylor 12 months ago

I would like Council to consider the impact on the streetscape of allowing residents to choose which tree they would like to replace one that has had to be removed. My street used to have a beautiful vista of plane trees alternating with paperbark trees. The real estate agent who sold us the house 30 years ago said that our street and two others nearby planted to the same scheme had a real estate value 10% higher than others in the area because the street was so beautiful. So a streetscape has - apart from anything else - a dollar value. But over the last ten years or so, trees replaced for one reason or another have been replaced with a hotchpotch of new trees, so there is no visual coherence and the beauty of the street has been destroyed. I do not see why a resident who might only live in a street for 5 or 10 years should have the power to ruin a streetscape that will last for 50 years or more.

Lisa Hill 12 months ago

It appears that you have to actually type (retype) everything into this - cut and paste does not work

treesandbirds about 1 year ago

Test

treesandbirds about 1 year ago

Re the Street and Park Tree Management Strategy
Dear Sir/Madam,
I vote for protecting both indigenous and non-indigenous vegetation (except designated weed species, of course).
Thinking of the long-term, it is smarter to preserve all remnant, indigenous vegetation. We have lost, and continue to lose) so many species of indigenous fauna and flora. Not just in Kingston Shire but nation-wide. It is imperative that we preserve what’s left.
Plaudits to Kingston Council for its ongoing native plant propagation and planting program.
All approved developments should, and must, include the retention of all indigenous flora.
For the health (both physical and psychological) of the community, protection of remnant Green Wedge is strongly recommended.
As for non-indigenous vegetation, especially trees, (excepting those deemed weed species i.e. grass and under-storey species) it is preferable to retain, where possible, rather than remove.
Added benefits of retaining vegetation include shade, its aesthetic quality, wild animal and bird habitat, and its ability to counter the heat- island effect of the ever-growing concreting of the city.
I wish all governing bodies could adopt the principle of protecting all remnant indigenous vegetation and, where possible, non-indigenous trees.
Thank you.
Sincerely
Peter Krause
6A Stawell Street,
Mentone Vic. 3194

Peter Krause about 1 year ago

I think that the emphasis should be on native trees, wherever possible, for street planting. It is ridiculous to plant very tall-growing trees, such as some Agonis, under power lines. Theses then have to be pruned (butchered!) to clear the power lines, and the whole canopy is ruined. Keep these in parks or on the side of the street without power lines and plant smaller growing natives instead. There are plenty to choose from including dwarf Corymbias and some Hakeas

Barbara Taylor about 1 year ago

I think it is important to specifically include that Council will, in the first instance, aim to plant native trees and shrubs and, only if this is not possible would alternatives be considered. I would also like to see encouragement/support of planting of trees in medium to high density developments (not planter boxes) as research has shown that vegetation is important to health and well-being.

Jinny about 1 year ago

I would like to see more trees added to the significant tree register. More green spaces and preservation of trees needed for Activity Zones. I realise these are prime development areas however there does not seem to be adequate strategies to preserve tree canopy covers in activity zones. Replacing large trees on development sites with some kind of requirement for "planter boxes" is not adequate and frankly just looks like paying lip service to the idea.

Trees are especially important in areas of development as they add a sense of space, have been shown to improve health and quality of life measures for residents, and add to air quality. Unless we want the activity zones to resemble barren wastelands of high rise development I strongly urge council to have a structured plan for preserving trees in these areas.

Indeed about 1 year ago

as a community member and involved in environmental management through friends groups, am concerned at the following:-

preserving trees (some quite large) in the area of chute and cedric street and on the mordialloc side of warren road - part of long term orchard/farming area in the past and an essential part of the local environment ask neightoburs about when planted will tell you 45 years ago and full of useful information

concerned that council removed tree from nature strip due to wet feet and untenable, and allows as part of housing developments on private land an excessive amount or trees in some areas near me, with consequences for root systems and steady growth affecting the roads and footpaths in the future. These will not stop growing and have major impact in the future.

need to preserve trees in proposed and future sports areas in the edithvale/Chelsea area, replacing them with concrete courts will have major impact on future hydrology and runoff in these areas prone to flooding now Need to protect roots by restricted parking in vulernable areas so trees not damaged and protected at ground level eg root systems needs to be monitored by local laws on some areas and education process undertaken.

consult with local environmental groups on plans and views on future plantings and assistance to promote planting activities for groups in the future.

thank you for the opportunity to comment on this margaret hunter

marg hunter about 1 year ago