Mordialloc Freeway - seeking the best outcome for the community

Update: December 2018
Kingston Council has finalised its submission to the Victorian Government that aims to ensure the new Mordialloc Freeway is built with the best possible outcomes for the community.

The final report is available for view in the document library on the right hand side of this page.



Community consultation on the Victorian Government’s plans for the new Mordialloc Freeway is now underway.

The Mordialloc Freeway is a proposed new 9km freeway linking the end of the Mornington Peninsula Freeway at Springvale Road to the Dingley Bypass. It will run alongside Waterways, Aspendale Gardens, Braeside Park, Dingley Village and local industrial estates.

Kingston Council is keen to ensure the project delivers the best possible outcome for the community and is calling for six key priorities to be included in the plans. We want to ensure these priorities are in-line with community opinions – and would welcome your feedback to help guide Council’s submission and influence the design of the new freeway.

What Council would like to see:

  • Sensitive interfaces of Braeside Park, Dingley Village, Aspendale Gardens and Waterways communities are well-managed – While noisewalls are included in residential areas, none are provided next to Braeside Park, Woodlands Industrial estate or parts of the Green Wedge. In residential areas noise walls should be carefully designed to reduce visual impact.
  • The design incorporates high-quality, visually recessive bridge structures to reduce visual impact
  • Effective visual and acoustic screening – In some sections no room is provided for landscaping to provide a visual/noise barrier between the Freeway and the surrounding homes/businesses.
  • Important community connections are maintained and the design should allow for future connections – Council welcomes the shared path along the freeway but would also like better connections with surrounding areas to ensure path is well-used eg: a link from Chadwick Reserve to Woodlands Estate and between Braeside Park and Mills Road. Council also wants the design to provide a separated link at the junction of the Dingley Bypass and the northern end of the Mordialloc Freeway.
  • The development should tell a clear, cohesive story that reflects the area – Current design has no clear theme and does not showcase views of neighbouring wetlands and open space.
  • Links and journeys are integrated, direct, accessible, legible, attractive and safe – Care must be taken to ensure pedestrian/cycling paths are safe, well-lit and attractive.


Find out more

  • Read Council's full draft submission Mordialloc Bypass Priority Project Outcomes - available in the document library on the right of this page.

  • View the Victorian Government's website on the project here.
    The Victorian Minister for Planning has determined that an Environment Effects Statement (EES) is required for the project due to the potential for significant effects.
    Watch the VicRoads short video about the EES on the right of this page.

Have your say
The community can have input into the project in a number of ways:

  • Read Council’s draft report and add your support to Council’s six ‘key priorities’ or suggest changes at www.yourkingstonyoursay.com.au by Monday 3 December. An independent inquiry panel appointed by the Minister for Planning is scheduled for February 2019. Any comments received before then can assist in guiding Council’s submission through the process.

  • To view more information about the Victorian Government proposal or to make your own submission about the new Mordialloc Freeway visit www.roadprojects.vic.gov.au/projects/mordialloc-freeway by Friday 14 December.

Update: December 2018
Kingston Council has finalised its submission to the Victorian Government that aims to ensure the new Mordialloc Freeway is built with the best possible outcomes for the community.

The final report is available for view in the document library on the right hand side of this page.



Community consultation on the Victorian Government’s plans for the new Mordialloc Freeway is now underway.

The Mordialloc Freeway is a proposed new 9km freeway linking the end of the Mornington Peninsula Freeway at Springvale Road to the Dingley Bypass. It will run alongside Waterways, Aspendale Gardens, Braeside Park, Dingley Village and local industrial estates.

Kingston Council is keen to ensure the project delivers the best possible outcome for the community and is calling for six key priorities to be included in the plans. We want to ensure these priorities are in-line with community opinions – and would welcome your feedback to help guide Council’s submission and influence the design of the new freeway.

What Council would like to see:

  • Sensitive interfaces of Braeside Park, Dingley Village, Aspendale Gardens and Waterways communities are well-managed – While noisewalls are included in residential areas, none are provided next to Braeside Park, Woodlands Industrial estate or parts of the Green Wedge. In residential areas noise walls should be carefully designed to reduce visual impact.
  • The design incorporates high-quality, visually recessive bridge structures to reduce visual impact
  • Effective visual and acoustic screening – In some sections no room is provided for landscaping to provide a visual/noise barrier between the Freeway and the surrounding homes/businesses.
  • Important community connections are maintained and the design should allow for future connections – Council welcomes the shared path along the freeway but would also like better connections with surrounding areas to ensure path is well-used eg: a link from Chadwick Reserve to Woodlands Estate and between Braeside Park and Mills Road. Council also wants the design to provide a separated link at the junction of the Dingley Bypass and the northern end of the Mordialloc Freeway.
  • The development should tell a clear, cohesive story that reflects the area – Current design has no clear theme and does not showcase views of neighbouring wetlands and open space.
  • Links and journeys are integrated, direct, accessible, legible, attractive and safe – Care must be taken to ensure pedestrian/cycling paths are safe, well-lit and attractive.


Find out more

  • Read Council's full draft submission Mordialloc Bypass Priority Project Outcomes - available in the document library on the right of this page.

  • View the Victorian Government's website on the project here.
    The Victorian Minister for Planning has determined that an Environment Effects Statement (EES) is required for the project due to the potential for significant effects.
    Watch the VicRoads short video about the EES on the right of this page.

Have your say
The community can have input into the project in a number of ways:

  • Read Council’s draft report and add your support to Council’s six ‘key priorities’ or suggest changes at www.yourkingstonyoursay.com.au by Monday 3 December. An independent inquiry panel appointed by the Minister for Planning is scheduled for February 2019. Any comments received before then can assist in guiding Council’s submission through the process.

  • To view more information about the Victorian Government proposal or to make your own submission about the new Mordialloc Freeway visit www.roadprojects.vic.gov.au/projects/mordialloc-freeway by Friday 14 December.
Kingston Council is keen to ensure the Mordialloc Freeway project delivers the best possible outcome for the community and is calling for seven key priorities to be included in the plans. 

We're keen to hear community views on our draft submission. 

You can either take part in a quick poll - or use this Guest Book to share your views. 

For longer submissions you can also email info@kingston.vic.gov.au

You need to be signed in to comment in this Guest Book. Click here to Sign In or Register to get involved

Noise along the Wells road has been going up to the uncomfortable levels. The new freeway will help the residents living along the roads in this matter.

Mark Bob 8 months ago

building this freeway is of very little benefit and a great deal of money will be spent for a small road. some of the benefits of living in aspendale gardens is the beauty of the landscapes, the serenity of sitting in one of its beautiful parks listening to the birds and enjoying nature. this will all go on the side of wells rd where this freeway is proposed.

connie Bernaudo 8 months ago

Thames Promonade is already waaay too busy. It will jot cope with all the extra traffic that will come with this freeway entrance.

Mwcoco 9 months ago

I strongly object to this road being built. We already have 2 major roads carry traffic around Aspendale Gardens, this will just add another! The new freeway will only provide temporary traffic relief along Wells road, until the freeway, like all freeways in peak traffic times, starts to slow down. Cars will divert off the freeway and back onto Wells road creating a traffic sandwich for Residents of Aspendale Gardens north of Wells road. And, what about the waterways: lost for ever. Building a bridge over the wetland is a crazy! dont do it!

John Catala 9 months ago

The City Council, as a local government, has the responsibility to protect public health. It has been well known, already in the 90s, by the local authorities the health hazard of living near freeways for the population. If it was known in the 80s that such an obsolete project of building a freeway was going to go ahead decades after, why did the council allowed housing developing just only 70metres away from the proposed freeway knowing the health hazard for the future residents? The Council should have stopped residential building near a fwy, this is well within the authority. Why did not the council warned the potential house buyers of the health hazards of living close to a fwy? Why it has not been mentioned in your proposal anything regarding the air pollution and the harm of air pollution on population living and working so close to the proposed fwy? No physical barriers can prevent polluted air from vehicles emissions from moving freely. There are an exhaustive number of medical and scientific studies that demonstrates the serious health impacts of air pollution in human health, that links air pollution with asthma, respiratory and cardiac disease and cancer. Air pollution would causes disease, poor quality of life and early mortality. The national regulations do not protect populations from all this harm. The City Council should be an advocate for human health and ask for the Government to abandon this Modialloc fwy project for the sake of the health and wellbeing of the residents and workers of the area. The Kingston City Council is responsible and accountable for the public health of its residents. It is a no-way back disaster. Please, act now, you still have time. Thanks.

Beatriz Prieto 9 months ago

Just a quick comment about the concrete sound walls that will run along the freeway, I haven't seen any mention of the types and numbers of trees or other vegetation that will be planted along the length of the freeway. With this Freeway running besides so many native parks like the Waterways Wetlands and Braeside Park, in my opinion there should be a big emphasis on planting as much native vegetation as possible to soften the concrete walls which are breaking up the green parklands. I may have overlooked this in one of documents and apologise if I have. Thanks, Craig

CraigB 9 months ago

Thank you for this opportunity to add my voice I’m a resident who has a property directly onto the wetlands .I do not object to the freeway but would like to see Vic Roads making some minor adjustments .Firstly the available land size is well over 1000 metres in width from the fence line of the Aspendale Gardens residents through to the grazing land fenced off .With the help of My Kingston council I would hope that the one design that has been put forward can be adjusted to protect the residents life style going forward .From the plans that I have seen and I have spoken to Vic roads representatives some residents will have only a 65 metre gap from there back fence to a concrete sound wall .If we are a world class suburb how can we let this happen when they have the land available to move it further away why is it so close to houses !! Do we not the residents affected by this have a say about our lifestyle going forward the impact of noise dust the pollution surely the council can put there strength behind a new design that is using the full width of the land available and not let it be built so close to local ratepayers who are only asking for a liveable suburb that they first moved too to continue after this project is finished .Are we a world class suburb or a third world suburb .cheers Bryan Aldridge

Bryan Aldridge 9 months ago

Please include the remodelling of the Old Dandenong Rd and Boundary Rd intersection as most residents of DV will go this way to the by pass , as there is no on ramp on Centre Dandenong Road heading north . We need a slip lane on the NE corner of this intersection to get back into DV

JON GARRARD 9 months ago

If I’d been buying up property along Wells Road I could see a benefit for this Freeway.

Tory 9 months ago

I use trails in the Kingston council area daily. I am sometimes on the trails for up to 4 hours a day. There are more walkers AND runners than cyclists on the trails around Patterson River, The Long Beach Trail (Mordy to Bonbeach) and The Mordialloc Creek Trail (Mordy to Waterways). The biggest percentage of cyclists on those trails are kids riding to and from school. The trails around Waterways are all gravel and used almost solely by walkers and runners. The bay trail between Mentone and Mordy is almost all gravel is mainly used by walkers and runners. The gravel trails mentioned above are all in top condition and remain so even in wet weather. They are currently ideal for their users- i.e. walkers and runners favour soft, natural surfaces for many reasons, school kids have a nice safe surface to ride on , adult riders can cruise along these trails on all types of bikes. I am not even a cyclist but can comfortably cruise at 40km/h on these gravel trails over fairly long distances on my cheap mountain bike.These Kingston Council trails are all world class and the council should be very proud of this fact. I feel the trail along the Mordialloc Freeway would best be gravel surface like the other trails in the area. A hard surface trail would be horrible and lower Kingston Council's high standard for setting the benchmark for brilliant trails.

Sean Williams 9 months ago

What is always forgotten in these "shared trails" is runners. Running burns much more calories than cycling or walking for the same period of exercise and has innumerable health benefits.It's all about cyclists and walkers when these concrete trails are put in. Anyone who has experience in running knows that concrete is an absolute nightmare to run on and will lead to injury sooner rather than later. It's what draws many runners to just give up and go to cycling instead. On lower impact surfaces such as gravel or grass this risk is lowered exponentially. I’ve been investigating running trails around Melbourne a lot and there seems to be a very strong worrying trend towards concreting paths, instead of keeping them as nice soft dirt/gravel trails which are much better for the legs. Especially in the new paths that are being put in like the Dingley bypass trail, the Eastlink trail, the Peninsula link trail and pretty much any new development where there are parks, the paths will be concrete. I must say that Waterways was very nicely done though, and is a perfect example of who you can blend a new development with nice trails and nature. It almost seems to me that concrete paths have just become the norm and it isn’t really questioned whether this is what the people would want or if it is the best option. It’s been scientifically proven that concrete is 10 times harder than even asphalt, so would be even more hard than grass/gravel is. These back up my point: https://www.more.com/lifestyle/exercise-health/best-running-surfaces-why-whats-underfoot-matters https://www.runnersworld.com/training/a20783151/the-hard-and-soft-of-it/ I don’t think walkers really like it too much either. It just feels unnatural, is harder on the legs. Despite what people may say, gravel is indeed accessible to people in wheelchairs. https://www.invictusactive.com/wheelchair-for-gravel/I reckon a compromise could be reached that makes both cyclists and everyone else happy without increasing cost/maintenance fees. A gravel or even a mown grass trail would be very nice and I reckon it could be one of the nicest trails in Melbourne and draw people to it. You could even have a gravel trail alongside an asphalt/concrete trail then both cyclists and runners/walkers are happy. Having said that the Longbeach trail from Mordialloc to Patterson river is all gravel and cyclists seem happy to use that to me. I’ve done the maths and it would be cheaper than concrete too. There is actually an example of a grass trail up near the Edithvale wetlands discovery centre which is nice to run along. I would imagine the costs of having a grass trail wouldn’t be very high at all. Now to the costs. To build the 9km path from concrete it would be 1.2 million dollars, it would be 180,000 to construct it from gravel, and asphalt would be $675,000. I got that from here: https://www.goldenplains.vic.gov.au/sites/default/files/Paths%20and%20Trails%20StrategyVol2_Final182013.pdfNow obviously there are maintenance costs associated with gravel: which are approximately $1600USD per mile per year, which is equivalent to $12,500AUD per year for the entire 9km length: https://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/1324/files/how_much_will_that_trail_cost_fri2007.pdf (page 21) So if it is $12,500 per year, it would take approximately 79 years for the costs of gravel to outweigh the cost of concrete, and the concrete is very unlikely to last that long anyway.

Michael Kernahan 9 months ago

The Only Issue I have is the new Exit Ramp leading to Thames Prom. At the moment if you are coming from River End Road down Thames and turning onto Wells it is a nightmare at the roundabout. Cars exiting the Frankston Freeway cut right to turn right into Wells. Cars along Thames that want to turn left into Wells cut across traffic too. It is very very close to the roundabout and dangerous. When they traffic increases with the new exit ramp, it will be a disaster, hope it can be alerted somehow.

Peter LB 9 months ago

The draft plan is excellent. I would like to stress some design considerations for the shared trailsA concrete shared trail will avoid for wear to drive train wear caused by wet grit from a granitic sand surface in drive train causing wear. It will will resist damage from heavy vehicles traversing the trail and require less maintenance.The aim of providing for links to surrounding areas and destinations is a good move. Thanks for this.Lines of sight and navigation signage are important, especially at trail intersections.Vegetation should be planted far enough from the trail to avoid foliage obstructing the pathway.Drainage on some existing paths has been inadequate. I would like to see more attention paid to this to avoid flooding.I would like to some links from the south end of the trail to areas south including Aspendale Gardens and Dandenong Creek Trail.

Joe Astbury 9 months ago

Bicycle paths need better connections with surrounding areas to ensure path is well-used particulary linking local activity areas and parks so they can become destinations for users. Create a link to other existing paths including Peninsula link and trails to Mordialloc.Noise walls are reqired adjacent to Braeside ParkIs there a design for a large tree canopy along the road and path?

kpb 9 months ago

I do not want this freeway in any form, I started 40 years ago objecting to it and nothing has changed.I think $375.million is absolutely ridiculous for 9 Kms and the high walls will create more problems with graffiti which is already a problem on fences around Chadwick reserve . The mess and dust will be a problem during construction too ! I think this will create a major problem at the Dingley bypasswhich is already very busy. So Please NO FREEWAY !! Thanks.

Shirley DeWever 9 months ago

I would like to see connections between the Shared Use Path and local housing estates to increase accessibility between homes and the path. A simple connection between the current footpaths at Ferntree Grove and Bangalow Way in Aspendale Gardens to the SUP would be great. Also, extend the Shared Use Path from where it ends at Springvale Road, somehow, all the way to the end of the Peninsula Link Trail in Patterson Lakes so there can be an uninterupted link from Clayton to Batxer. This would benefit so many bike riders so they don't have to tackle the dangerous and narrow Wells Road and footpaths between Springvale Road and the Patterson River. I also support your ideas to make the link on Bowen Parkway better, so maybe just put lots of signage and clearly mark the shared use path with dotted lines. Thanks.

Me 9 months ago